Psychoanalytical Theories and Attachment Theory

Psychoanalytical Theories and Attachment Theory

Psychodynamic theory and its derivatives can be traced to the father of psychoanalysis, Sigmund Freud. You likely are familiar with the image that often conjures Freud: A client lying on a couch with a therapist sitting nearby, notepad in hand. The psychoanalytic terms “id,” “ego,” “superego,” “repression,” and “unconscious” are deeply embedded in the layperson’s jargon.

Many theories have sprung from Freud’s psychoanalytical principles. Attachment theory is one example. Its originator, John Bowlby, was directly influenced by Freud, but because of Bowlby’s experiences in working with disturbed children, he believed that a child’s psychosocial development is linked to their attachment to the mother. Because all theories must be tested using empirical research methods, Mary Ainsworth tested John Bowlby’s theory using the Strange Situation experiment, which involved observing children react to caregivers and strangers. The results from her research led to what we now know as attachment styles.

This week, you switch your lenses to consider a case study through these theories.

Learning Objectives
Students will:
Summarize the assumptions of psychoanalytical theories and attachment theory
Evaluate the strengths and limitations of psychoanalytical and attachment theories
Develop reflection questions to apply attachment theory in social work practice
Apply attachment theory to a social work case study
Photo Credit: [Tom Merton]/[OJO Images]/Getty Images
Learning Resources
Note: To access this week’s required library resources, please click on the link to the Course Readings List, found in the Course Materials section of your Syllabus.
Required Readings
Turner, F. J. (Ed.). (2017). Social work treatment: Interlocking theoretical approaches (6th ed.). New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
Chapter 1: Attachment Theory and Social Work Treatment (pp. 1–22)
Chapter 25: The Psychoanalytic System of Ideas (pp. 398–410)
Foley, M., Nash, M., & Munford, R. (2009). Bringing practice into theory: Reflective practice and attachment theory. Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work Review, 21(1/2), p39–47. http://dx.doi.org/10.11157/anzswj-vol21iss1-2id318

Note: You will access this article from the Walden Library databases.
Auld, F., Hyman, M., & Rudzinski, D. (2005). How is therapy with women different? In Resolution and inner conflict: An introduction to psychoanalytic therapy (pp. 217–236). Washington DC: American Psychological Association.

Note: You will access this book chapter excerpt from the Walden Library databases.
National Association of Social Workers. (2008). Code of ethics of the National Association of Social Workers

error: